Religious or belief discrimination

If you feel that you have been discriminated against due to your religious beliefs our discrimination team would be happy to discuss your case. We appreciate that this is often a difficult time and offer a range of funding options available to help. In some circumstances we may be able to offer a ‘no win no fee arrangement’. Please complete our online enquiry form or call us on 0203 816 9302 and we will be happy to discuss your options and guide you through the process.

Under the terms of the Equality Act, less favourable treatment experienced as a result of a person’s religious or philosophical beliefs of lack of such beliefs, (for example atheism), is prohibited and is considered to constitute discrimination.

Generally, a belief is interpreted as a mindset which affects an individual’s life choices and the way in which they choose to live their lives day to day.

The law also provides protection against discriminatory conduct as a result of a perception that an individual is of a certain faith or holds particular beliefs, even if the perception is incorrect.

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Discrimination claims

Further, discrimination under this head can also take place if a person is treated less favourably because of their association with a family member, friend or group which holds a belief or follows a particular faith. An individual who associates with others of a different faith or belief is therefore protected against discrimination from others which is perpetrated due to the religion or belief of his/her associates and not their own.

The protection afforded by the Equality Act applies to every stage of the employment relationship i.e. advertising vacancies, recruitment, promotion, training and other opportunities and dismissal.

This protection also extends to discrimination in the course of an individual’s day to day life as a consumer or service user.

Less favourable treatment can be experienced directly or indirectly in the workplace and in the course of an individual’s day to day life and can take various forms. This can include the making of unpleasant comments towards them in the course of their employment by colleagues or in the course of their day to day lives as consumers or service users.

Such conduct can be considered by the tribunals and the courts as harassment if it is believed that the behaviour has had the effect of violating the individual’s dignity or created an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for them.

Commonly, cases involving religious or belief discrimination include claims for direct discrimination, indirect discrimination, harassment and/or victimisation.

Who can be held accountable for religious discrimination?

An employer, public body, service provider or association can be held accountable for the conduct of their employees which gives rise to claims against these businesses or organisations.

If you believe that you have been the victim of discrimination as a result of your religion or belief and would like to speak to a member of our team call us on 0203 816 9302 or complete our online enquiry form without delay.

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