Domestic violence FAQs

How will I pay for the court’s protection?

Legal aid is available for those who are eligible. Our family solicitors are experienced in obtaining protective orders for our clients. If our clients are not eligible for legal aid costs can be agreed. Contact us for further information on 0203 816 0548.

I am concerned about my safety, what should I do?

Anyone who is immediately concerned about their own personal safety should contact the police on 999. The police have a duty to provide protection and to prevent criminal acts being committed.

Once safe, specialist legal advice should be sort from solicitors with expertise in working with adults and children who are living with domestic violence. Stephensons' specialist solicitors can provide the information and help needed, call us on 0203 816 0548.

There are a number of organisations within our communities who offer practical help and advice in these circumstances including Women’s Aid, (www.womensaid.org.uk) and Refuge, (www.refuge.org.uk).

Things will get worse if I try to get help – what should I do?

An experienced solicitor can help apply for an order for protection very quickly and initially without the other person being told about what is happening. The courts accept that there are circumstances when the situation can become worse when a person asks for help. The court can accept urgent applications that can be dealt with secretly. Once the protection is in place, the other person is then informed of what has happened and provided with copies of the court papers. They then have a right to have their say in court.

What is domestic violence?

The term “domestic violence” covers a wide variety of behaviour committed by one person against another. It does not simply refer to violence or threats of violence but of course includes it. There are many people who are perpetrators of domestic violence who may not actually be violent. Their behaviour will still fall within the term “domestic violence” and will be harmful to partner and any children by making them feel afraid. A phrase regularly heard refers to the family “having to walk on egg-shells” to avoid situations. Such behaviour might include losing their temper over small things, mood swings, criticism of appearance and their behaviour, isolating them from family and friends and making all the decisions concerning them. This sort of behaviour could be described as being controlling, demeaning and/or disrespectful to the other and may be causing harm.

The courts can make a variety of orders to protect an individual from such behaviour when the police are not in a position to take action. It is not necessary for there to been actual violence. Situations of domestic violence do not just cover married or cohabiting couples. They include a wide variety of relationship problems including former partners and relatives.

Stephensons' specialist solicitors are very experienced in advising and representing people in such circumstances. Confidential and sensitive advice is available from specialist solicitors who can also recommend other organisations to provide additional support and assistance.   

What sort of protection can I expect from the court?

The Court has the power to make a number of orders which will not only protect the person and/or any children but which can also prohibit someone remaining in the family home or prevent someone coming to a property where they live.

An experienced solicitor will be able to advise on the best options to provide the protection needed, contact us on 0203 816 0548.

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