Disciplinary issues

To understand how to defend yourself in disciplinary issues, it will be helpful to know what sort of actions can be disciplined. Examples may include:

  • Poor time keeping
  • Unexplained absences
  • Misuse or vandalism of University property
  • Offensive or aggressive behaviour
  • Failing to comply with safety procedure
  • Refusal to comply with reasonable management instruction
  • Breaching university trust
  • Refusal to comply with university policy
  • Any examples of gross misconduct – for example, theft, indecent behaviour, threat of violence, the possession of illegal drugs or weapons etc

At University it can be easy to get yourself into situations that potentially could be disciplined. In these situations it is important to seek advice at the earliest point possible to make sure your rights are protected. Some students have been disciplined for handing in assignments late or not attending lectures even when they have had a good reason for doing so. This is where we can help.

Most universities will have in place a procedure they must follow when dealing with these types of cases. This is important, if a university does not follow any procedure, it can be harder to promote good personal conduct in students as they may feel that they are not given a fair chance to defend themselves. Furthermore, it may provide an opportunity to appeal or seek to quash the findings.

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So what happens if you are faced with a disciplinary issue?

The first thing the university will do is write a report explaining the student’s misconduct which will also include how the behaviour conflicts with university policy or code of conduct. This will be submitted to the relevant authority which will either be the head of the university, the warden of the hall of residence or director of service.

The disciplinary action will very much depend on the seriousness of the misconduct. They may deal with the allegation at a face to face interview which you can attend with a friend or someone to support you. The University may ask you to write a statement of the event. Then a decision will be made.

Failure to attend or comply with any of these steps may lead to suspension from the course until you decide to engage.

In each stage of proceedings, you have the right to know not only the allegation against you but also the evidence they have to back this up. Without this information you cannot be given a fair opportunity to defend yourself. In addition to this, you also have the right to an impartial decision maker who is capable of making an unbiased decision.

At Stephensons we have an experienced team to make sure that at every stage of proceedings you will receive sound, reliable advice. Do not hesitate to contact us regarding any issues you may have on 0175 321 5096. Getting the right advice now will avoid a lot of problems you could face later on - don’t leave it too late.

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