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Wardship & orders under the inherent jurisdiction

The High Court has a duty to protect children who have been removed from their parents or are considered at risk, vulnerable or in danger. It is the duty of the court under its inherent jurisdiction to ensure that a child who is the subject of proceedings is protected and properly taken care of and protected.

Although not widely used since the introduction of the Children Act 1989, wardships can be granted for complex or unusual cases where the court can exercise its inherent jurisdiction to make any order or determine any issue in respect of a child, effectively becoming the child’s legal guardian.

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What is Wardship?

Wardship is the term used for court proceedings where a child is made a ward of court and the court’s consent will be needed for any important life decisions to ensure the child’s safety and protection. Day-to-day care stays with the usual guardian or local authority.

Why choose Stephensons?

Stephensons have experience in acting in cases where children have become wards of court and can support you in understanding which proceedings would best support your case.

If you would like to speak to a member of the team about wardship and orders under inherent jurisdiction call us on 01616 966 229.

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